Collection

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Definition A collection is an organized, systematic form of purposeful aggregation, grouping or arrangement of elements, that has an identity of its own separate from the identity of the elements.
Explanation A collection's metadata should provide one or more reasons why this particular group of elements belongs together as part of a collection process.

Collections are often associated with archives and repositories and their services.

Examples A collection of books in a library. In this case the library serves as a repository for selected books and other media.

Collections usually serve multiple functions, such as selection and collocation of related materials, narrowing of search scope, and clarification of information needs.

References H. L. Lee, H. L. “The concept of collection from the user’s perspective.” Library Quarterly, 75 (1), 67-85. 2005.
Scope RDA Term Collection Core
Status New


Definition Collection is defined as "a group of objects gathered together for some intellectual, artistic, or curatorial purpose."
Explanation
Examples
References "Representing Cultural Collections in Digital Aggregation and Exchange Environments"

http://www.dlib.org/dlib/may14/wickett/05wickett.html

Europeana Data Model (EDM)

Scope RDA Term Collection Core
Status New


Definition A collection is a digital object which is identified by a PID and consists of a set or a list of PIDs/Ids and a set of additional pointers/links and metadata together with each PID/Id.

A collection can be given explicitely by naming each PIDs/Id directly as well as implicitly by a generating rule.

A collection is called finite, if the set of PIDs/Ids, generated by iteratively resolving its "sub-"collections, is finite.

Explanation By definition a collection can contain other "sub-"collections. A collection and its sub-collections define a graph and this way a finite collection becomes a finite graph.

Suggestion: only finite collections should be under investigation of the Research Data Collections WG. Otherwise one has to guarantee self-consistency of the definition, and also the proof of finitness for processes becomes in general much harder.

Examples 1) Given a digital object together with its earlier versions:

a) the collection PID points to a set/list of all the PIDs/Ids pointing to an earlier version. In a set the previous relation would be lost, in a list it can be contained in the order of the PIDs/Ids.

b) the collection PID points to a set/list of one PID/Id pointing to the digital object and one PID/Id representing the previous version, which again points to a set/list of one PID/Id pointing to the digital object and one PID/Id representing the now previous version, and so on.

2) Try to interpret the OAI-ORE example (URI http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0601007) of the Primer User' Guide in the context of this definition.

References OAI-ORE example: http://www.openarchives.org/ore/1.0/primer
Scope BOF PID Collections
Status In discussion